Tag Archives: beach

Corona Save The Beach art contest update

The contest brief is based around beach conservation and is helping to raise awareness of beach conservation and littering. The entries have been pouring in, with some incredibly inspiring photographs, painting and digital art. Below are some of the recent entries. Click the thumbnails to view full size on Deviant Art.


The Corona Save The Beach campaign is a pioneer environmental initiative to identify, clean up and preserve the beaches of Europe and educate the public about the importance of keeping beaches clean. The campaign is supported by the Foundation for Environmental Education and it’s Blue Flag programme, the quality seal awarded each year to beaches and marinas meeting strict environmental criteria. As well as running this art contest, members of the public were invited to send in their photographs or videos of dirty beaches they visit. In July 2009, Capocotta, a beach on the Roman coast, was the beach chosen by a public vote to be cleaned. Capocotta was shortlisted along with other areas including Puertito de Guimar in Tenerife, Spain, Heraclion in Greece and a beach in Norfolk, UK.

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Artists helping Corona Save The Beach

Corona Save The Beach have just launched an art competition on Deviant Art – inviting artists to create work on the theme of beach conservation, litter, pollution and green living. The winning works will be put on display on the Save The Beach website mid September.

Until then you can find out more on Deviant Art

savethebeach

Interested in entering? Here’s the Artists Brief..

Artists are invited to enter artwork in any medium on the theme of beach conservation,litter and pollution. This could be sculptural – created from actual litter and debris you find at the beach, and then photographed (great examples of environmental beach litter art by artist Jane Rose can be seen here: [link]) or even create sand sculptures!
If you don’t live near a beach, you can submit photography, digital pieces, photo manipulations or traditional art depicting the plight of our beaches and the need to conserve them. You can also include text if you wish, or add Corona Save The Beach banners

More about the Project..

The Corona Save The Beach campaign is a pioneer environmental initiative to identify, clean up and preserve the beaches of Europe and educate the public about the importance of keeping beaches clean. The campaign is supported by the Foundation for Environmental Education and it’s Blue Flag programme, the quality seal awarded each year to beaches and marinas meeting strict environmental criteria. As well as running this art contest, members of the public were invited to send in their photographs or videos of dirty beaches they visit. In July 2009, Capocotta, a beach on the Roman coast, was the beach chosen by a public vote to be cleaned. Capocotta was shortlisted along with other areas including Puertito de Guimar in Tenerife, Spain, Heraclion in Greece and a beach in Norfolk, UK.
Start preparing your entries for the 2010 Corona Save the Beach campaign – get behind your local beach and it may be the winning beach to be “saved” by Corona.

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Britain’s beaches fail European hygiene standards

Britain’s beaches fail European hygiene standards
An increasing number of popular swimming spots in the UK have failed to meet European hygiene standards including parts of Lake Windemere, the chic Cornish resort of Rock in Cornwall and Sandgate in Kent.

By Louise Gray, Environment Correspondent
Published: 6:03PM BST 12 Jun 2009
Britain’s beaches fail European hygiene standards
Rock beach in Cornwall which has failed European hygiene standards Photo: MARTIN POPE

The vast majority of the nation’s favourite coastal areas and inland lakes or rivers meet strict EU bathing water cleanliness standards.

However the heavy rains last summer means that more sewage, litter and chemical run-off from farms was found in the 608 swimming spots assessed last year. Some 24 coastal areas and Millerground Landings in Lake Windermere failed to meet the minimum standard, which means they may not be safe to swim in at certain times of year or in particular areas. This is a rise from the 20 beaches that failed the test in 2007.

The EU does not consider the bathing areas dirty enough to close them down but leaves it up to the local authority or Environment Agency to test the water and advise the public if it is safe to swim.

Most of the UK bathing areas needing improvement were in the South West – Devon and Cornwall – and in Scotland including Portobello in Edinburgh and beaches around Plymouth.

Earlier in the year the Marine Conservation Society recommended just 370 out of 775 of the UK’s most popular bathing beaches in its annual Good Beach Guide, a fall of 17 per cent on last year and the lowest number since 2002.

Keep Britain Tidy have also reported the number of beaches awarded a Blue Flag for overall cleanliness this year fell by 11 to 71 – although that is still an improvement from 2002 when just 45 made the grade.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said it is tackling the problem of pollution from sewers by tightening standards to stop leaks. The problem of run off from farms is being dealt with by awarding grants to build fences between livestock and watercourses and controlling use of chemicals.

“We’re working to improve sewerage systems and are aware of the effect heavy rain and flooding can have on our coastal bathing waters” said a spokesman.

The EU carried out tests at more than 21,000 bathing spots around 27 countries last year. The vast majority in favourite holiday spots like Cyprus, France and Spain met EU hygiene requirements with 96 per cent of the total coastal bathing areas and 92 per cent of bathing sites in rivers and lakes up to standard.

UK beaches and inland swimming spots failing to meet minimum EU clean water standards in 2008 were:

Northern Ireland:

Ballyholme.

Scotland:

Machrihanish (Argyll and Bute),

Saltcoats/Ardrossan (North Ayrshire)

Sandyhills (Dumfries and Galloway)

Portobello Central (Edinburgh)

Rosehearty (Aberdeenshire),

Cruden Bay (Aberdeenshire)

Aberdeen.

Wales:

Llandanwag

South West:

Seaton (Cornwall)

East Looe (Cornwall)

Rock (Cornwall)

Readymoney (Cornwall)

Porthluney (Cornwall)

Plymouth Hoe East (Devon)

Plymouth Hoe West (Devon)

Exmouth (Devon)

Instow (Devon)

Coombe Martin (Devon)

North:

Allonby (Cumbria)

St Bees (Cumbria)

Aldingham (Cumbria)

Windermere, Millerground landings (Cumbria)

Yorkshire and Humberside:

Staithes (North Yorkshire)

South East:

Sandgate (Kent).

Read the original article from the Telegraph.co.uk here

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Shocking beach litter in Naples

As featured on Corona Save the Beach

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What to do when a dirty beach ruins your holiday?

For most of us, our summer holiday is a much anticipated event. We save up, book a long time in advance, ask the boss for time off work, buy new clothes – in short – it is a big deal!

What happens then, when you reach your destination or resort, head for the beach, only to discover it’s nothing like the brochure promised. Those turquoise seas and white beaches are replaced by litter,debris and runaway construction work. Filthy streams or sewage pipes running down into the sea; which turns out to be a grey foamy mess of floating plastic bags or worse? We don’t always have transport on holiday so quite often we’re stuck with what’s within walking distance of where we’re staying.

Many of us are rightly very upset and disappointed by this situation. In the UK, we have a certain ‘watchdog’ mentality of recording the probelms we encounter on holiday. This is great if something gets done about it, but often we just receive an apology from the holiday company, perhaps a partial refund if we’re lucky. But the beach? Nothing gets done.

What to do about it?

  • Firstly do bear in mind that in most cases the hotel you are staying at will not be directly responsible for the beaches nearby (unless it’s their own private beach). However if the beaches are advertised in their brochures as part of the holifay and include pictures which are misrepresentative, then it’s my opinion that you have a right to complain.
  • While you’re still away , complain to the tour company representative in the resort straight away. The rep should provide you with a customer complaint form.
  • Take photographs or video footage to back you up
  • Back home, there are plenty of travel community sites like www.tripadvisor.com where you can register and write reviews of the places you’ve visited. This lets others know what to expect of the same desitinations.
  • Keep writing those letters of complaint, to both the agent you booked with and also directly to the hotel. If they don’t know they won’t be able to fix it! Don’t assume someone else will make a complaint, or leave it weeks and weeks before you get round it. Anythng over 28 days is too long
  • If you can find out who the local council is that is charge of the beach, write to them too.

Corona Save The Beach – Getting something done

This summer, one of the best ways of getting something done about dirty beaches on holiday is to send in your photo or video evidence to Corona Save The Beach

Corona have pledged to clean up and protect the worst beaches in Europe and the UK – and keep them that way. Visitors to the website can vote on which beaches they consider to be in most need of help. This is a sure fire way of getting attention where it’s needed.

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Travel advice: Beware beach guides

Guides to the best of Britain’s beaches do not necessarily tell the whole story, advises Sophie Butler.

For most of us, the summer wouldn’t be complete without a trip to the seaside. But how can you make sure you choose a beach that isn’t littered and contaminated by polluted water?

You might imagine that the Good Beach Guide 2009, launched by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) earlier this month, would be the answer. But it doesn’t give the whole picture.

What it does give you is information about the seawater. It includes details of its water testing for more than 770 beaches in the UK, listing the top 370 beaches that pass the EC’s most stringent “guideline” water tests, those that pass the less demanding “mandatory” levels; it also names 78 blacklisted beaches where the water fails the minimum legal standards.

But it doesn’t tell you how clean the sand is, how well managed the beach facilities are, whether the dog ban is effective, litter is picked up, swimming and watersports are properly zoned or the lifeguards are doing a good job.

Thomas Bell, of the MCS, defends the guide. He says: “The beaches we recommend are good from the MCS’s point of view and the purpose of the guide has always been foremost about promoting and campaigning for better bathing water quality.”

The truth is that there’s no single award scheme that tells you all you might want to know about a beach. However, below are details of the schemes that will be operating around our coast this summer and what they tell us.
2009 Beach Award Schemes

MCS Recommended Beach (www.goodbeachguide.co.uk). Gives details of water quality and sewage discharges at resort and rural beaches. You can read the full list on our website at telegraph.co.uk/travel.

Blue Flag (www.blueflag.org.uk). European-wide scheme indicating large, well-managed resort beaches where water reaches the highest guideline standard.

Quality Coast Award (www.qualitycoast.org). Launched by Keep Britain Tidy to pinpoint smaller resorts with good facilities, or larger resorts where water quality passes minimum required standards but not the higher levels demanded by Blue Flag.

Seaside Award (www.keepscotlandbeautiful.org). Run by Keep Scotland Beautiful and divided into Resort and Rural categories. Beaches must be well-managed and meet the lowest water standards.

Green Coast Award (www.keepwalestidy.org). Operated by Keep Wales Tidy and highlights the country’s quiet, less-developed beaches where water quality passes the highest EC water standards.

Read the original article from the Telegraph

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Clean Seas + Great Beaches = Wonderful Open Water Swimming

The Marine Conservation Society (MCS) of the UK has launched its user-friendly clean beaches guide. The online guide includes an interactive map with photos and information on hundreds of beaches with the latest water quality data for England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The water quality data is visually presented in an easy-to-understand, easy-to-navigate online guide.

The MCS guide includes all the test data – obtained once per week from May to September by the relevant government agencies – and 300 other beaches that are not tested for water quality.

MCS recommends beaches that have passed 100% of the European Mandatory water quality ity tests with at least 80% of the tests passing the European Guideline total and fecal coliform standard and a minimum of 90% of the tests passing the European Guideline fecal streptococci standard. To attain the highest grade, the beaches must also not have poorly treated continuous waste water discharge. The runoff from rain (official ‘wet weather waivers’) are ignored.

MCS also provides information on beaches with bad water quality where swimming is not advised because the water failed the European legal minimum water quality standard and less than 95% of the samples passed the European Mandatory standard. The water at these beaches suffer gross contamination by sewage on at least two occasions in the previous swim season. MCS advises against swimming and other immersion water sports.

Photo shows Port Eynon in Swansea on the Gower peninsula in Britain. The MCS guide describes this as a perfect family beach and an area of outstanding natural beauty with lifeguards, easy access to parking and shopping with a wide expanse of golden sand and rock pools to explore at low tide.
Posted by Steven Munatones – read the original article here

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